Hack Reactor Students Weave Together Top Music Streaming Services

With the proliferation of music streaming services, it's time someone weaved them together into a unified platform with a social element. That's exactly what four Hack Reactor students did when they created Daniel Almaguer, Nick Escallon, Ray Ma and Alex Taylor created a program that allows people to see the playlist they are listening to, suggest additions and vote on songs.

" combines Rdio, Soundcloud and Youtube's APIs to provide a uniform user experience," the developers explain. "It has an integrated user interface that allows users to seamlessly search and stream music from all of these services as if they were all from one source." integrates several top music streaming services. integrates several top music streaming services.

This is a natural evolution of the music streaming service, but it's only half of what offers. The program, as the team explains, transforms DJing from a monarchy to a democracy:

" also emphasizes the music sharing experience. A user can easily make and share a 'party' playlist, allowing friends with access to search and add songs. They can also vote on songs currently on the playlist in real-time using SocketIO so that songs with more votes are played sooner."

Users can share playlists and let their friends vote on songs.

Users can share playlists and let their friends vote on songs.

Perhaps most impressive of all is that a project of this scope was well beyond the scope of this team only weeks ago:

"Hack Reactor gave us - four guys with practically no prior coding experience - the chops to build ammo from scratch. We were introduced to and drilled on fundamental javascript and computer science principles. Beyond that we were exposed to the various tools and frameworks that allowed us to design and architect ammo in such a way that enabled us to build and deploy an MVP within 2 weeks." is currently in beta, and the group has big plans for its continued growth. Future plans include, "supporting additional music services, cross-browser compatibility, and deploying a mobile app which will simplify the shared playlist experience."

While it's easy to see how would enhance a friendly gathering, it's biggest potential might be in bars and clubs. DJs could crowdsource their playlist, and let their audience listen to whatever they want.

Read more:

Hack Reactor Student Pilots Drone with Leap Motion and Node.js

Kohl's Scavenger Hunt: Hack Reactor Engineers Demo On Stage at Hackathon

JavaScript Instantiation Patterns by HR Student Brett Hoyer