LifeHacker, Product Hunt Highlight Pawprint, Alumna’s Pet Medical Records Startup

As a dog owner, Emily Dong was well aware of what a pain pet records are, and as a developer with an entrepreneurial spirit, she was inclined to solve problems. After graduating from Hack Reactor and completing the school apprenticeship program, Dong started working on her startup, Pawprint, to digitize pet medical records. A year later, Pawprint, with only a CEO (Dong), a CTO and a part-time support staff member, has worked with with 1,500 veterinary offices.

“As a pet owner you don’t have your own records unless you maintain a copy, and that tends to be out of date,” she explains. “The thing about pet records versus human records is that you have to show them a lot more often. Even if you are bringing your dog in for a haircut, you have to show that your dog had its vaccines.”

startup, alumni, lifehacker, product hunt, hack reactor

Emily Dong's startup Pawprint brings modern technology to pet medical records.

From the interest Pawprint has drawn, it’s clear that thousands of people have been looking for something exactly like this. The appeal goes beyond national borders.

“There seems to be some demand outside the U.S. We’re only live in the US, but we’ve gotten requests from Australia, India and London. There have been a couple veterinary offices [in other countries] that we talked to.”

As the business has matured, it has started to get some attention from the press, including LifeHacker and Product Hunt.

“I’ve been using this app for a few months now and I love it,” wrote a LifeHacker commenter. “They’ve been improving and updating every month or so with pretty big enhancements. These have made storing and sharing my pet information with friends and family very simple.”

A commenter on Product Hunt stated that, “We have four dogs in my household and this product will change the way we take care of them.”

The app is a tremendous help to veterinary offices as well, due to features like automated appointment reminders. The plan at Pawprint is to continue to expand its reach and services it offers to both veterinary offices and pet owners.

“We are building out a lot of new features to the app,” says Dong. “After that we’ll start making more partnerships and get records into the hands of a lot more pet owners.”

Dong credits her time at Hack Reactor for giving her key skills that allowed her to make Pawprint a reality. She also built the first version of it as her final project at the school.

“I still spend 50% of my time coding. Hack Reactor gave me an MVP [Minimum Viable Product] and a really good set of skills.”

Want the ability to turn your ideas into code? Apply to any school in our network today.

Read more:

Grad of First Hack Reactor Class Selected as Code for America Fellow

Hack Reactor Hosts 54-Hour Startup Weekend for Alumni

Alumna Combines Artificial Intelligence & Internet of Things Using NASA Software