New Student James Edwards Blogs about Object Subclasses and Learning JavaScript

Student James Edwards is only in his second week at the school, but he’s already turning concepts that he solidified as a Hack Reactor student into blog posts that others can learn from. His latest post deals with a topic that a lot of JavaScript coders can have trouble with: object subclasses.

“I had been confused about sub-classes and prototypal inheritance for a long time and I had a hard time finding information about it on the internet,” Edwards explains. “After we covered the topic at Hack Reactor I felt very comfortable with the concepts and I thought it would both help me to retain the knowledge and help others to learn if I explained them in my own words in a blog post.”

Student James Edwards has been solidifying some of what he's learned through explaining concepts in blog posts.

Student James Edwards has been solidifying some of what he's learned through explaining concepts in blog posts.

Hack Reactor places a lot of value on teaching as a learning tool. Mastering a topic to the point that one can explain it ensures a more full understanding of it.

“All those grey areas that you have in your understanding,” says Lead Instructor Fred Zirdung, “you have to get all those cobwebs out and make sure the lines are crisp.”

For this reason, Hack Reactor uses pair-programming at many points in the program, so that students get a chance to explain topics and learn from each other.

In Edwards’ post, he prefaces a fairly in-depth discussion with a simple framework:

"There is a lot of misinformation on the web about making classes and subclasses in JavaScript. Since the right way is both simple and logical, clearing the air about this issue will not be hard. The problem we face has three steps...

How do I make a object delegate to another object?
How do I make a class in JavaScript?
How do I make a subclass that delegates to another class?"

(Edwards notes that JavaScript doesn't actually have classes, but there's a way to hack around that.)

Objects are central to JavaScript, and having a strong handle on how they work allows for clean, efficient code. This helps our students stay dynamic as new platforms and technologies emerge.

“Hack Reactor has taught me how to use objects to add progressively specific functionality to my code while inheriting the previously implemented functionality in a controlled way. This is an extremely powerful technique, but it can become confusing or inefficient if you don't know the proper way to do it.”

Check out Edwards full post here. Interested in a top-notch coding education, grounded in the fundamentals? Apply to Hack Reactor today!

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