1. San Leandro High School Launches Hack Club with Hack Reactor’s Help

    Jiahao Kuang’s story is about how community can turn coding from a hobby to a passion. Kuang, a sophomore at San Leandro High School, had dabbled with coding, but his interest really took flight last March when he went to Hack Camp, a two-week session for high schoolers put on by hackEDU. (Hack Reactor provided office space to hackEDU for an extended period last winter.) Hack Camp showed Kuang both the power of coding, and how much more fun and stimulating it is with a group of like-minded people. The experience inspired him to start his own Hack Club in his high school, and eventually connected him to Hack Reactor.

  2. Student Outcomes Director Talks Tech Industry at National Youth Leadership Forum Panel

    Blake Williams, our Director of Student Outcomes, spends his time at Hack Reactor helping graduating students get jobs that best fit their skills and personalities, but recently he spent some time with a different type of student. He spoke to high schoolers from across the country interested in becoming professional coders as a guest on the Next Steps panel at the National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF):Technology and Innovation. This was part of a week-long immersive experience in getting to know the technology industry, put on by the NYLF, which included Hack Reactor as a leading member of the increasingly important coding school space. As the member of our team responsible for ensuring our outcome rates of 99% placed within three months at an average starting salary of $105,000, Williams is an expert on the technology jobs landscape. He was joined on the panels with executives from Draper University, 500 Startups, Dev Bootcamp and Vungle.

  3. Hack Reactor Hosts High School Coding Group hackEdu

    As of this month, Hack Reactor is hosting hackEDU, an organization that supports high school coding clubs, on an ongoing basis. HackEDU, started by Zach Latta and Jonathan Leung, is less than a year old, but has already accomplished an impressive amount. After a trial run last Spring, the organization ramped up, and is now working with over 30 high school coding organizations. HackEDU connects these clubs with a growing set of resources and a support network.