1. San Leandro High School Launches Hack Club with Hack Reactor’s Help

    Jiahao Kuang’s story is about how community can turn coding from a hobby to a passion. Kuang, a sophomore at San Leandro High School, had dabbled with coding, but his interest really took flight last March when he went to Hack Camp, a two-week session for high schoolers put on by hackEDU. (Hack Reactor provided office space to hackEDU for an extended period last winter.) Hack Camp showed Kuang both the power of coding, and how much more fun and stimulating it is with a group of like-minded people. The experience inspired him to start his own Hack Club in his high school, and eventually connected him to Hack Reactor.

  2. Is Computer Science Education Suffering from a Communication Breakdown?

    A recent USA Today article revealed a surprising disconnect between parents and school administrators on the importance of teaching computer science. While parents are near unanimous on the importance of computer science education, school principals are not hearing this message--very few of them believe there is much demand from parents for more computer science classes. These findings come from a large study conducted by Gallup and Google.

  3. Remote Student Talks Meteor, Women & LGBT in STEM

    Kate Jefferson’s nudge to become a Software Engineer started as a frustration with what she was doing. After seven years working at accounting jobs, she felt her impact was limited by the tech tools she had to work with in her role. Furthermore, she didn’t have the skills to create better tools to manage the databases she worked with.

  4. JP Morgan Chase, Change.org, DocuSign & 30+ Employers Interview Grads on Hiring Day

    JP Morgan Chase, DocuSign, Change.org, and over thirty more companies gathered at Hiring Day to conduct interviews with our graduating students. The day started with student teams demoing the projects they worked on in the last weeks of the course. Projects ranged from a home monitoring system, to a Tinder-like job search app, to a visual display of worldwide Twitter data using the Oculus Rift and Leap Motion controller.

  5. Student Team Builds JavaScript Battle: A Game for Artificial Intelligence Aficionados and Newbies

    While it’s easier than ever for lay people to learn the basics of coding through online programs like codecademy, the bar for artificial intelligence programming is still prohibitively high for most people. That’s what motivated a team of Hack Reactor students, led by Greg Trowbridge, to build JS Battle, an artificial intelligence game that welcomes newbies to the field, but is engaging for experienced AI coders. The project topped the popular news aggregator Hacker News on the first day of its release.