Student Startup Creates Online Medical Records for Pets

Medical records are moving online for humans, but what about pets? A team of Hack Reactor students is building Pawprint, a project to bring all the advantages of online data to veterinary care. Pawprint was started at Hack Reactor as the team’s final student project, and, with graduation just around the corner, the venture will work toward becoming a start-up business.

A potential client for Pawprint.

A potential client for Pawprint.

"I have two dogs, and I've moved around and traveled with them quite a bit. So I wanted a centralized way to keep their medical records," says Pawprint founder Emily Dong. At present, the veterinary world is a scattered mix of paper records and internal systems. Obtaining official medical records for moves, pet boarding, travel and other scenarios can become a logistical nightmare.

"It's really gratifying to recognize a really straightforward issue of being a pet owner and use what we learn [at Hack Reactor] to solve it," says Taylor Harwin, who built Pawprint, along with Dong, Jonathan Huang and Benjamin Lee. "We have two pets. Each has its own vet. We're moving. To get those records has taken tons of back and forth."

For pet owners, Pawprint is appealingly simple: users simply enter information about their vet and pets, and within a few days, the program will have their medical records. Providing this ease of use required a lot of thoughtful work from the Pawprint team.

"A lot of things had to be done very carefully," says Lee, "as opposed to just hacking away at it, and that sort of changes your working style."

Pawprint provides easily accessible proof of medical records for boarders, vets and airlines, and gives pet owners the assurance that they are keeping their furry friends healthy.

The group plans to launch at the end of July, and you can stay up to date with the company and how it can help your pets at To read more about Pawprint, check out Emily Dong's personal blog.