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PayPal, SalesForce, Reputation.com and over twenty other companies came to Hack Reactor’s Hiring Day on Tuesday. The event is a fun and highly efficient way for our graduating Software Engineers to make substantial connections with a large number of interested tech companies.

The day starts with demos of projects built over the last three weeks of the program.

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Developers from Ionic hosted a workshop over the weekend on their popular framework at The Douglas, Hack Reactor’s alumni lounge. Ionic, which has been connected with Hack Reactor since its early stages, allows JavaScript developers to build mobile apps for Android, iPhone, Windows and even Blackberry. Ionic, which is built on top of Angular.js, provides a framework for developers who are less familiar with mobile-specific languages to build high-functioning mobile apps. Hack Reactor students and Instructors have been working with Ionic since its fledgling stages, and by the time that Ionic was a fully realized framework, many in the Hack Reactor community were intimately familiar with Ionic development.

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Students come to Hack Reactor from all sorts of paths, but probably none as long and arduous as Ricky Sidhu’s. That Sidhu even made it to Hack Reactor, and is now a Web Developer at LinkedIn, is a result of pure willpower. He chronicled this journey in an inspiring post on LinkedIn. Sidhu grew up in a town in northern India. He dreamed of one day being an engineer, but that dream was derailed by tragedy.

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We tend to think of the job interview process as a test to pass, but really it’s a two-way street: the applicant sussing out the company is just as important as the company evaluating the applicant. But how do we evaluate a company, especially if we want to go beyond the culture and assess if it is financially viable? While this might be confusing for many Software Engineers, student Mario Ponticello has an investment background, and he knows about obtaining this crucial information.

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Hack Reactor uses a unique and powerful instructional method called rapid-iteration teaching, designed specifically for the school by Lead Instructor and Curriculum Designer, Marcus Phillips. Now, Marcus is up for a panelist position at SXSWedu--the education-focused wing of South by Southwest--to speak about changing education toward a more powerful, dynamic model. Listen to Marcus explain his method and vote for him here.

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When Hack Reactor announced its Remote Beta program, back in June, it was “a dream, a miracle” for Chibueze Ukaegbu. The ability to take Hack Reactor’s course without relocating from his home in Nigeria burgeoned a mission that Ukaegbu had committed to before he’d even heard of Hack Reactor: starting TechHub, a JavaScript-based programming school in Nigeria.

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Hack Reactor students, instructors and alumni have a hub to stay in touch with each other: the Community Blog. This is a forum for students, instructors, and others in the Hack Reactor network to share their thoughts, experiences and code. Whether they have moved on from Hack Reactor or are still at the school, our community members are constantly taking on new projects, experimenting with programming tools and doing deep dives into fascinating topics. Everyone gains by having a shared space to learn from each other’s experiences.

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In creating the school, Hack Reactor's founders had to make key decisions that would define the institution going forward. One of the most essential was which programming language to teach. At the time, there was one fairly obvious choice: Ruby. Ruby had been the dominant language of the last ten years. That’s why it turned a few heads when Hack Reactor decided to focus on JavaScript.

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